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came suddenly choked, the mother stating she had re- moved with her finger a small piece of the breastbone of a chicken but was satisfied that a small portion still remained and was lodged in the windpipe. The child's dyspnoea and appearance seemed to bear out the history. Upon examination of the throat I found that both halves of the tonsils and uvula had a de- cided diphtheritic appearance. This, of course, aroused my suspicion, but amazon viagra online I was still doubtful of the diagnosis, for, as the mother had tried repeatedly to remove the bone, it amazon viagra online was possible that she had injured the soft parts. The child had suppression of urine, and a micro- scope not being available, I was prevented from ar- riving at discount viagra europe a diagnosis. The child was put under the usual treatment for diphtheria until the next morning, awaiting developments. In the mean while the dysp- noea increased to such an alarming extent that trache- otomy was almost decided upon. Being yet undecided as to the foreign substance, at n p.m. three cubic centimetres of antitoxin was in- jected between the shoulders. At 6 p.m. of the same day the condition remained unchanged, influenced only by the action amazon viagra online of the antitoxin. At 7 a.m. the following clay the child's dyspnoea was much im- proved and the membrane was disappearing rapidly. At 6 p.m. the child's breathing was almost normal and the membrane had almost completely gone. The pa- tient was kept up on whiskey and strychnine and other supportive treatment during her enure sickness, and she made an uninterrupted recovery. To-day I saw the child, one month from the day I was first called, and found her perfectly well, with no indications of any foreign substance in the windpipe. The point of interest in the case is that, had it nol been for the administration of antitoxin, tracheotomy might have been performed, without benefit and very probably with disastrous results. A CASE discount viagra europe OF CANCRUM ORIS FOLLOWING CAPILLARY BRONCHITIS- DEATH. By WALTER B. WINE, -M.l>., STANFORD, MONT. A. S , white, male, aged nine months, family his- tory good, previous history excellent, came under my care December 30, 1894, suffering from capillary bronchitis. The usual treatment was prescribed. Re- covery was uneventful, and amazon viagra online the case was dismissed on January 5, 1895. February 5th. I was again called and found the following: Respiration and pulse rapid, temperature 103 J2 F. ; there was slight diarrhoea; the child was fretful and refused to nurse; its lower amazon viagra online lip was slightly swollen, everted, and fissured near the median line: the breath was fetid. February 6th. Temperature is slightly increased. There is an ulcerated spot of the gums in left lower molar region ; necrosis of the maxilla is also begin- ning at this point and emits a very fetid odor. February 7th. Symptoms graver, lower lip slightly everted, presenting a circumscribed gangrenous area about size of a dime, which is dry. indurated, and cold. February 8th. Temperature discount viagra europe ioa r F., respiration and pulse amazon viagra online very rapid; nearly the whole of the lower lip is amazon viagra online now gangrenous, involving also the lower part of the left cheek. No attempt was made at cauterizing the necrotic tissues, as some authors recommend, and the case ter- minated fatally. This case is reported here because of its infrequent occurrence. January [8, 1S96] MEDICAL RECORD. 89 A Medical Record.- Weekly Journal of Medicine and Surgery, GEORGE amazon viagra online F. SHRADY, A.M., M.D., Editor. Publishers WM. WOOD & CO, 43, 45, &. 47 East Tenth Street. New York, January 18, 1896. THE EVOLUTION OF THE DOCTOR. One can hardly fail to believe that the contemporary English physician is a very superior kind of a man, for he is nowadays getting so many pleasant things said about him. We recently quoted a eulogy on the doctor by the well-known author, Ian Maclaren. Now from another source come statements equally gratifying to the self-esteem of the physician. The Rev. August Jessop, of Norfolk, says in the Nineteenth