Buy Viagra One | Genuine Viagra Sale | Best Pharmacy













































3 4 2S1 n 2^2 34 Limits of the Physician's Duty to the Depen- dent Classes. Dr. Walk, writing in the American Medico-Surgical Bulletin, says genuine viagra sale that the physician as a man and as a citizen owes a great duty to civilized so- ciety, a duty which is conditioned buy viagra one upon his special knowledge. Acquainted as he is with the importanc laws of heredity and the reciprocal influence of mental and physical states, the responsibility rests upon him to lead the community in which he lives to a higher civilization and to better modes of life. He should be a teacher of the people, and not only by training men to cure disease but, pre-eminently, a teacher of preventive medicine, that department of our science now almost new, but destined to become its pride and glory. The question of his duty in regard to medical charities is genuine viagra sale much less simple. Here also an obliga- tion rests upon him, as, for instance, in cases of sudden accident, etc. But this is a very small part of the so- called " charitable" work now thrust upon the profes- sion. It is the common notion that the doctor should treat, free of charge, all the dependents in his neigh- borhood and should also give his services to both public and private institutions. Institutions supported out of the tax rate are, in no proper sense, charities. Their cost is levied upon all the citizens, in propor- tion to their taxable wealth, and there is no call for any one to serve them gratuitously. All others are paid for their services, but the physician is supposed to act upon some principle not applicable to other sensible men. Apart from the institutions supported by public taxes comes the yet wider field of the private charities. In these institutions it is right and fair that physicians should make contributions to them in service, if buy viagra one they see fit, but this right has its limita- tions. Free medical service, to come within the defi- nition of a wise and judicious charity, should be ren- dered to those only who are unable to pay for it. To give it to others involves two wrongs: the first, to the younger men of the medical profession, who ought to genuine viagra sale have turned over to them those patients who are able to pay only small fees; the second, to the community. by the encouragement of pauperism and the under- mining of independence. Twelve years ago a thor- ough investigation of the dispensary system of the city of Philadelphia was genuine viagra sale made, and quite recently the same ground has been traversed with a similar genuine viagra sale result by a well-known buy viagra one physician of genuine viagra sale that place. In thirty- two free dispensaries there were treated in one year one genuine viagra sale hundred and sixty-one thousand and twenty-nine cases, which was about twenty per cent, of the entire population of the city, or one-fifth of all the people. Carefully compiled statistics show that, in Philadel- phia, the actual pauper class does not exceed one per cent, of the population. If medical men do all of this vast work from charitable motives, certainly they need to be converted to a more judicious and discriminat- ing doctrine of charity. If this service is rendered June 6, 1S96] MEDICAL RECORD. 825 from selfish motives, the advantages derived from this free service have been greatly overestimated. Xo medical man should indulge the pleasing delusion that the patients he treats at the dispensaries suppose him to be doing a noble and philanthropic act, and putting them under a corresponding obligation. In their view the accommodation is generally the other way. The valuable experience that may be gained by dispensary practice is often lost from lack of time to make a really scientific examination. If, then, the duty of the physician to the dependent classes and also considerations of self-interest demand the restric- tion of free medical service, it is obvious that the ex- isting system should be buy viagra one radically changed. Efforts made to restrict free aid to the indigent have, thus far, in almost every instance failed through the oppo- sition of the physicians themselves, who desire to have largely attended clinics. The very enormity of the genuine viagra sale evil may, however, lead to a powerful revulsion of sentiment, when means will readily be found to dis- criminate between genuine viagra sale the poor and those able to pay for treatment. Moral Insanity.. In the Journal of the American Medical Association, March 14, 1896, the subject of moral insanity is editorially referred to in the following words: " Recently a very reputable medical man was convicted of a heinous crime and sentenced to prison for life. In the effort to collect facts to genuine viagra sale be used in securing pardon the counsel discovered a most un- usual life of hypocrisy. He had been cruel and harsh from boyhood. He enjoyed causing pain and suffer- ing in others, and as a student he fairly revelled in the agony of animals in vivisections and the pain of persons diseased. To this was added great egotism